After-Thanksgiving Turkey Stew w/ Whole Wheat Potato Rolls

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This After Thanksgiving Turkey Stew is plain and simple requiring minimal ingredients: leftover turkey, canned tomatoes, sweet potato, green beans and fresh herbs.  If you’re anything like me, I’m usually over Thanksgiving food by day two.  By this time, I’ve either cut up and frozen the remaining turkey or if the mood hits me, I’ll make this Turkey Stew.  It came together rather quickly, which is much needed after laboring over the stove preparing an entire Thanksgiving dinner.  The Whole Wheat Potato Rolls were leftovers from Thanksgiving and added another level of excitement to the mix.  I’ve been eyeballing this recipe from B. Smith’s cookbook for awhile, but I needed the perfect time and inspiration to make them.  They came out tender, soft and moist.  The perfect accompaniment to the Turkey Stew.

You can use what ever you have on hand to make the stew.  I already had cooked sweet potato and I used frozen green beans.  If you’ve gone a little overboard with Thanksgiving dinner (mac and cheese, stuffing, potato salad, pie and so on), this stew is clean eating at its best.  Add quinoa or brown rice for extra fiber if you’d like.  Serve in soup bowls and use the bread to dip up the yummy tomato broth.

Enjoy!

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After-Thanksgiving Turkey Stew w/ Whole Wheat Potato Rolls//makes 4 servings

turkey stew
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 cups diced cooked turkey
2 cups peeled and cubed sweet potatoes
2 rosemary sprigs
2 thyme sprigs
1-14.5 oz can diced tomatoes
2 cups turkey or chicken stock
1 ½ cups green beans, fresh or frozen
Freshly ground black pepper and salt to taste

In a 2-qt sauce pan, sauté onion and garlic over medium high heat until translucent.  Add diced turkey, sweet potato, rosemary, thyme and the stock.  Bring to simmer.  While simmering, add the green beans.  Lower the heat and cook for 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender.  Season with salt and pepper.  Once done, ladle soup in individual soup bowls.  Serve immediately. 

Note: If using frozen green beans, add the last 5 minutes of cooking to avoid over cooking the green beans.

whole wheat potato rolls//makes 12 rolls
adapted from B. Smith’s Entertaining and Cooking for Friends

1 large potato (12 ounces), peeled and cubed
4 teaspoons active dry yeast
1 tablespoon sugar
2 ¾ cups unbleached all-purpose flour
2 ¼ cups whole wheat flour
1 ½ teaspoons salt
2/3 cup milk, warmed (105 to 115 F)
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Cook the potato in boiling water salted water until tender.  Drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking liquid, and mash the potato well.  Set aside.

Cool the reserved potato cooking liquid to between 105° and 115° F.  Then stir the yeast and the sugar into the liquid and let the mixture stand until it is frothy (about 10 minutes).  Meanwhile, stir the flours and salt together in a large bowl.

In a large mixing bowl, stir together the yeast mixture, warm milk, eggs, melted butter, and mashed potato.  Add 3 cups of the flour mixture and beat for 5 minutes, until very smooth.  Gradually add more of the flour mixture to form a dough.  Turn the dough out onto a floured surface, and gradually knead in the remaining flour.  Continue to knead the dough until it is smooth.  It should be soft but not stick. If necessary add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time.

Place the dough in a large greased bowl, and turn it over once to coat the top with grease.  Cover the bowl loosely with greased plastic wrap, and let the dough rise in a warm place for 1 hour or until it has doubled in size.

Grease 12 large muffin cups.  Punch the dough down and divide it into 12 pieces.  Shape them into smooth rounds and place them in the muffin cups.  Cover as before, and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes or until doubled in size.  Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400° F.

Bake the rolls for 15 to 20 minutes, until they are golden on top and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom.  Transfer them to a wire rack to cool completely.

Vegan Sushi Burrito

Vegan Sushi Burrito

My total new obsession!  I had so much fun making these and my little one’s got in on the action also.  Vegan Sushi Burritos are a fun, lunch on the go twist to your traditional sushi routine.   I loaded my sushi burritos with nutrient packed veggies: beets, sweet potato sticks, bok choy, shitake mushrooms and tofu teriyaki sticks.  I’ve ordered these burritos at other restaurants, but I wanted to concoct these delectable beauties in my own kitchen.  The items that you’ll need to make your burritos are nori sheets, Japanese short grain white rice (you can do brown rice or quinoa), and a sushi rolling mat.  You will also need to keep your hands wet when adding the sushi rice to the nori or you will end up with rice all over your hands.  You will want to keep a small bowl of water near you while you spread the rice.  The sushi burrito is totally customizable.  Feel free to add your favorite ingredients such as teriyaki eggplant, smoked salmon, kimchi, you name it.  I prepped all my veggies and arranged them on the cutting board so the kiddos could build their own burrito’s.  It’s a fun family project and a great healthy snack or main meal. 

Enjoy!

 

Vegan Sushi Burrito//serves 4
Adapted from Cilantro & Citronella

Rice
3 cups Japanese short grain rice
½ cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt

Teriyaki Tofu Sticks
Half a block of extra-firm tofu, drained and pressed
2 ½ tablespoons cornstarch
1-2 tablespoons oil
¼ cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons sugar
½ tablespoons ginger
1 clove garlic, grated
2 tablespoons water

Sushi burritos
4-8 nori sheets
1 large sweet potato, peeled, boiled and cut into sticks
1 medium beet, julienned
1 medium cucumber, julienned
4-5 medium sized shitake mushrooms, sliced
3-4 baby bok choy, leaves only

For the sushi rice, rinse the rice with fresh water 3-5 times until the water is clear.  Place the rice and 3 cups of water in a pot and bring to a boil.  Reduce the heat to low and cover.  Alternatively, cook the rice inside a rice cooker according to the manufacturer’s directions.

While the rice is cooking, combine the vinegar, sugar and salt until dissolved.  After the rice is cooked, place the rice into a large bowl and season the rice vinegar, sugar and salt mixture.  Allow to cool.

Quick tips:   Do not scrape the rice out from the bottom of the pot.  If it comes out easily, great.  If not, don’t bother.  You want perfect looking rice for your sushi, not rice that is burned.  Also, use a wooden spoon as a metal spoon will damage the rice and react with the vinegar.

For the teriyaki tofu, combine the soy sauce, mirin, sugar, ginger and garlic in a bowl.  Set aside.  Cut the tofu into sticks and place in a Ziploc bag with 2 tablespoons of cornstarch.  Shake.  Heat a large pan over medium-high heat and add the oil.  Fry the tofu until they are golden brown.  Add the sauce to the pan and allow to simmer.  The tofu will start to get caramelized.  Flip tofu sticks to the other side and caramelized on both sides.  Place tofu on a plate atop paper towels.

To assemble the sushi burritos, lay one piece of nori in front of you, shiny side down on a sushi rolling mat (not a requirement, but helpful).  Keep a small bowl of water beside you to wet your fingers while gently spreading the rice over the nori.  Don’t squish or pat the rice onto the nori.  The grains will break.  Keep space at the top and bottom (about 1 cm) of the nori to allow easy rolling.

Lay down rows of tofu and the remaining fillings.  Begin rolling your sushi from the top (facing you).  Once rolled, wet the bottom of the nori to seal.  Continue with remaining sushi burritos

 

Macro Bowl w/ Adzuki Beans, Brown Rice, Veggies and Amaranth Crunch

Macro Bowl! 

This bowl is inspired by one of my favorite restaurants here in Los Angeles called Backyard Bowls.  They create these amazingly healthy acai breakfast bowls as well as porridge and grain bowls.  My go to bowl is the California Macro Bowl, which consists of brown rice, adzuki beans (I’ll touch on these in a minute), kabocha squash, watermelon radish (they’re so pretty), and a host of other yummy veggies.

For my take on their California Macro Bowl, I prepared adzuki beans and steamed brown rice, then added watermelon radish, shredded carrots, micro kale, mashed sweet potato, and a little something extra … amaranth crunch.  Amaranth is an ancient grain that is packed with iron and pops like popcorn when placed in a very hot dry pan.  I have never prepared amaranth this way, so this was a momentous occasion.  Watching this grain pop into a tiny popcorn kernel, gave me all the feels.

Now, back to adzuki beans.  I try to eat a wide variety of legumes to get myself out of plant based rut. Out of habit, I have my go to legumes and then I remember, other varieties exist.  This realization will inevitably inspire new recipe ideas.  Adzuki beans are small, red beans that originated from China.  These beans are usually found in a lot of Asian desserts mashed and cooked with sugar.  Think red bean paste.  However, they are frequently used in the macrobiotic diet.

This recipe is pretty simple to bring together. Once you prepare the adzuki beans and brown rice, you add all of your vegetables.  Other options for your macro bowl are lentils, chickpeas, white beans, quinoa, farro, barley, millet and loads of veggies.  However, vegetables such as tomatoes, eggplant, asparagus (if you’re following a macrobiotic diet) are to be avoided.  Also, the emphasis is on fermented vegetables.  I use this brand and add to my macro bowl sometimes.

Enjoy!

Macro Bowl w/ Adzuki Beans, Brown Rice, Veggies and Amaranth Crunch//serves 2

bowl
1-15oz can adzuki beans, drained and rinsed (or legume of choice)
1 tablespoon tamari sauce
2 cups cooked brown rice (or grain of choice)
1 large sweet potato
1 medium sized watermelon radish, sliced into rounds
2 carrots, peeled and julienned
1 cup shredded pickled beets, divided between bowls (recipe found here)
1 cup micro greens, divided between bowls

amaranth crunch
2 tablespoons amaranth

Preheat the oven to 425 F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and bake whole sweet potato for 20 to 25 minutes or until easily pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and set aside to cool.  In a small saucepan, add adzuki beans and bring to a boil.  Add the tamari sauce to the beans.  For the sweet potato, removed skins from sweet potato and place in a bowl.  Mash sweet potato with a fork or potato masher.  If you would like a smoother texture, add sweet potato to a food processor with a little plant based milk. 

For the amaranth crunch, place small saucepan on medium high. Place 2 tablespoons of amaranth in the saucepan.  The amaranth should immediately start popping.  If the amaranth begins to burn, your stove is not high enough.  Adjust heat until the amaranth begins to pop into specks of white kernels.  Once done, begin assembly of your bowl.  Divide brown rice between two bowls, add cooked beans, mashed sweet potato, carrots, pickled beets, watermelon radish, micro greens and top with the amaranth crunch.